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Feed your soil & the soil will feed you!

Soil health is incredibly important for the successful growth of your plants. There are many factors that affect a plants growth including the amount of nutrients present in the soil, water availability, exposure to light, weather conditions such as wind and the degree of shelter from the elements. Feeding your plants and soil are a necessary part of gardening which improves growing success. As seen below, the bucket analogy known as Liebig's Barrel (1828) states the law of the minmum. If one nutrient is deficient or lacking, then plant growth will be limited even though all the other nutrients may be at adequate levels, therefore in order to increase plant growth, that one deficient nutrient needs to be increased. Also note the varying heights of the bucket staves, which highlights how each nutrient is required at different levels.




Nutrients in the soil are eventually used up by the plants or washed away by the rain. Therefore fertilisers and liquid feeds are useful to help maintain nutrients in the soil. Other options include remin volcanic rock dust, clay buster compost which is good for clay soils, sea sand and peat-free composts. We stock a wide range of options for all your fertilising needs, check them out on our website.




Autumn is also the perfect time of year for soil testing, which will help you to add nutrients which are limited in your soil, but not excessive amounts of those that are in good supply already. This is good in order to prevent adding too much. Some of the most important to test for is pH, phosphate and potash levels. Brassica plants prefer a pH around 6.5.



At the moment, we have a range of kales, spring cabbage, borecoles, savoys, wallflowers, stocks, autumn beans, aquadulce Claudia and autumn peas readily available. Please do contact us if you are having any trouble with your online orders or have any questions regarding caring for your plants. Andrew's phone number: 07971317140





References

Bucket analogy photo: https://www.badgercropnutrition.co.uk/benefits-of-zm-grow


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